Sanctuaries, Southern Borders, Presidents, Generals…

In today’s political climate, many are appalled at what’s going on in our government. People feel, rightly so, that things have gotten out of control and that politicians are running lawless and making up government positions for their cronies. But it is not unusual for presidents to customize their staff and nor is it unusual in other government departments. In 1824, John C. Calhoun was the Secretary of War. In March of that year, he created The Bureau of Indian Affairs. He created it as an agency and made it a division of his war department. He did this without approval from Congress.

Seven years earlier, tensions were growing between the Seminole Indians and white colonists along the border of Florida and Georgia. The Seminoles were providing sanctuary for runaway slaves. This tension along the southern border gave Secretary of War Calhoun, President James Monroe and General Andrew Jackson, what they felt was justification for war that resulted in the taking of land from the Seminole. Today it’s sanctuary cities and building a southern wall. It’s true what they say, history repeats itself. Again and again.

Ever wonder if you have Native American ancestry? It’s not an easy route, tracing American Indian ancestry. But there are things you can try. But first, you need to know where to look and what not to waste time on. Suellen Ocean is the author of Secret Genealogy IV – Native Americans Hidden in Our Family Trees. http://www.amazon.com/Secret-Genealogy-IV-Native-Americans/dp/1500756105 and Acorns and Eat’em, a how-to vegetarian cookbook and field guide for eating acorns, http://www.amazon.com/Acorns-Eatem-How–Vegetarian-Cookbook/dp/1491288973

 

 

Native American Ancestry? Five Tribes… Five Nations… What’s the Difference?

Don’t get the Five Nations mixed up with the Five Civilized Tribes. The Five Nations had five tribes in it, until they had six. (The Tuscororas came later, in the early 1700’s.) Before that, the Five Nations were the Mohawks, Oneidas, Cayugas, Ohondaga and Senecas. They formed the Iroquois Indian Nation. The Five Nations means the Iroquois.

The Five Civilized Tribes were nations until Congress terminated their governments in 1907. They consisted of the Cherokee, Chickasaw, Choctaw, Creek and Seminole tribes. They were driven out of their homelands and “settled” in Oklahoma where today you will find many of their descendants. By the early 1900’s, the government saw them as willing to assimilate into white civilization. History shows us that the tribes put up great resistance but by the early 1900’s, they had suffered such a severe genocide, they had no other choice.

Suellen Ocean is the author of Secret Genealogy IV – Native Americans Hidden in Our Family Trees. Available here:

http://www.amazon.com/Secret-Genealogy-IV-Native-Americans/dp/1500756105

History… America’s “Era of Good Feeling”

After the War of 1812, the subsequent years (1817 to 1824) are recorded as a contented time for Americans. Under the presidency of James Monroe, Americans were anxious to build the country. It brought a sense of togetherness, which brought teamwork, which brought prosperity. Americans were so content during this period, it is referred to by historians as “the era of good feeling.”

One reason Americans were content was because there was virtually one political party, the “Democratic Republicans.” Today we have: Democrat, Republican, Libertarian, Green, American Independent and those we call Independent. And there are others. With all these political parties, it’s easy to see why today, there are so many opposing views.

Not everyone living under President Monroe would have agreed that it was the era of “good feeling.” During this time, growing and building the country meant “Westward Expansion.” That expansion was into Native American lands. The taking of Indian lands resulted in a genocide of the Native people. It was a high price to pay for the rest of America’s “good feeling.”

Suellen Ocean is the author of Secret Genealogy IV – Native Americans Hidden in Our Family Trees. Available here:

http://www.amazon.com/Secret-Genealogy-IV-Native-Americans/dp/1500756105

Oysters… Native Americans… Colonists… Here’s What Happened

Just like everything else, humans assume that just because something is abundant, it always will be. Not true. And oysters are a perfect example. Native Americans enjoyed them in their diet. But as Native tribes were driven from prime Atlantic locations and European colonists displaced them by the thousands, they gobbled up the Native’s beloved oysters. By the end of the 1800’s, the oyster population was almost decimated. When companies started canning and preserving oysters for the growing market, it made things worse. Today, in a controlled environment, oysters are raised and harvested. They’re ready for consumption after about four years. Native Americans knew the wisdom of preserving natural resources, unfortunately for them and for the native oysters, they were out-numbered.  Suellen Ocean is the author of Secret Genealogy IV – Native Americans Hidden in Our Family Trees. Available here:

http://www.amazon.com/Secret-Genealogy-IV-Native-Americans/dp/1500756105

Kentucky Ancestors of the Dark and Bloody Ground

There are a lot of ways that Native Americans could have entered a European American family tree. One way is through one of the many Indian wars on what was called “the dark and bloody ground” of Kentucky. But when original native names were changed to common European names, there is almost no way to tell that they were Indian.

Even before the white man came and made war with the local tribes, Kentucky was known as the “dark and bloody ground” because there were so many Indian wars upon its soil that the ground was soaked with blood. When Indians were captured and taken prisoner, they frequently fell into slavery. Many of the women were made wives by the frontiersmen. It’s very difficult to identify these native ancestors. Constant sleuthing among the genealogical message boards is one way, although much of the information is hearsay, much of it is not. These ancestors are dead and gone but sometimes their stories live on. Message boards are a great place to find them.

Suellen Ocean is the author of Secret Genealogy IV – Native Americans Hidden in Our Family Trees and Secret Genealogy V– Black, White and Hamite; Ancestors of Color in Our Family Trees. Available here:

Secret Genealogy IV:  http://www.amazon.com/dp/1500756105

Secret Genealogy V: https://www.amazon.com/dp/B01HJ622DU

Genealogy: What Were Your North Carolina Ancestors Worth? 10 Pounds Sterling?

If we’re lucky, we will run across a will belonging to our ancestors. If it was three-hundred-and-fifty years ago, it may have consisted of silver candlesticks, beeswax, a wooden cupboard and a cow. That was their net worth. History reveals other wills, listing the names of slaves who were passed on to living family members as if they were livestock. They had no net worth for they had no freedom. And then there were the 400 Tuscarora Indians of North Carolina, taken prisoner by Colonel James Moore after he attacked them during the Tuscarora War, one of the many battles during the French and Indian Wars. Colonel Moore sold them into slavery for 10 pounds sterling each. Within the tribe of the Tuscarora were other small tribes, including the Coree. The Indians not captured, escaped to the north and lived among the Iroquois who labeled them the Sixth Nation.

Suellen Ocean is the author of Secret Genealogy IV – Native Americans Hidden in Our Family Trees and Secret Genealogy V– Black, White and Hamite; Ancestors of Color in Our Family Trees. Available here:

Secret Genealogy IV:  http://www.amazon.com/dp/1500756105

Secret Genealogy V: https://www.amazon.com/dp/B01HJ622DU

Our Primitive Ancestors… We Can’t Go Back… But We Can Look Back

Kindle COVER Secret Genealogy IVI’m looking at a picture of Paleolithic (primitive) art. It is an exquisite drawing of a bison and a wild boar. The drawings are of such greatness, they could have only been completed by an accomplished artist. Let’s picture that for a moment. A man (or woman) reproducing in detail, the muscular anatomy, and emotion of the beasts that gave them sustenance. The animals that the artist so skillfully depicts (beef and swine) still provide sustenance to humans. Even today, a few hunters venture into the wild to hunt wild pigs. But we all know that most meat eaters buy their meat in the store.

It wasn’t that long ago that Native Americans hunted bison… the great buffalo herds that ranged across North America. The resources from the buffalo gave them skin to cover their tipis and leather to make clothes. The furry hides kept them warm in the form of blankets, thread was made from the hair of these beasts and from their bones were constructed tools and runners for sleds. The hooves provided a glue and the manure that was left drying on the ground was used as fuel.CreatespaceAcornsAndEat'emFRONTCOVER

The caves in Spain where the ancient drawings are preserved, are described as “polychrome.” I had to look that up. It means, many colors… specifically… painted on a background of many colors. I cannot think of a better and more colorful analogy of who we are today. One of the many colors, painted on the colorful background of our colorful ancestors who, if we could go back, stretch to the beginning of time.

Suellen Ocean is the author of Secret Genealogy IV – Native Americans Hidden in Our Family Trees. Available here:

http://www.amazon.com/Secret-Genealogy-IV-Native-Americans/dp/1500756105

And… Acorns and Eat’em, a how-to vegetarian cookbook and field guide for eating acorns. Find it here: http://www.amazon.com/Acorns-Eatem-How–Vegetarian-Cookbook/dp/1491288973