They Might Be Indians But They Are to be Treated as Runaway Slaves…

During the early 1800’s, when Andrew Jackson (the Indians called him Sharp Knife) worked his way into the presidency, he worked on relocating the Seminole Indians from Florida. The end game was the removal of all Seminole Indians from Florida. They were to exchange their land for land in the west. They were offered money, blankets for the men and frocks for the women. Woe to any Seminole who had an African ancestor. They were to be treated as runaway slaves. It did not matter if the taking of a mother or father, tore the family apart. Like the one-drop rule in other states, the white colonial relocators believed that anyone with any black ancestry should be enslaved.

Eventually, after several “Seminole Wars,” there were Seminoles who emigrated west as requested. They took cash and offered peace. But for many years the Florida Seminoles fought successfully. While the men fought the military, the women and children found refuge in the thick Florida jungles. Today, the descendants of the Seminole who resisted, can still be found in Florida, especially in the Florida Everglades.

Suellen Ocean is the author of the series, Civil War Era Romances. Available here:

Book One, Black Pansy: https://www.amazon.com/dp/1484900278

Book Two, Blue Violet: https://www.amazon.com/dp/B018ZWX0R4

Book Three, Black Lilac: https://www.amazon.com/dp/B01EKJMTKA

Book Four, Ellie: https://www.amazon.com/dp/B01LWVNCTS

Book Five, Rose Thorn: https://www.amazon.com/dp/B06X1GN58T

Book Six, Mississippi Wild Blue: https://www.amazon.com/dp/B072L2WWMR

Book Seven, Dandelion Lane: https://www.amazon.com/dp/B073WPHMWG

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Oysters… Native Americans… Colonists… Here’s What Happened

Just like everything else, humans assume that just because something is abundant, it always will be. Not true. And oysters are a perfect example. Native Americans enjoyed them in their diet. But as Native tribes were driven from prime Atlantic locations and European colonists displaced them by the thousands, they gobbled up the Native’s beloved oysters. By the end of the 1800’s, the oyster population was almost decimated. When companies started canning and preserving oysters for the growing market, it made things worse. Today, in a controlled environment, oysters are raised and harvested. They’re ready for consumption after about four years. Native Americans knew the wisdom of preserving natural resources, unfortunately for them and for the native oysters, they were out-numbered.  Suellen Ocean is the author of Secret Genealogy IV – Native Americans Hidden in Our Family Trees. Available here:

http://www.amazon.com/Secret-Genealogy-IV-Native-Americans/dp/1500756105

American History… the Clash Between Cowboys and Indians

Kindle COVER Secret Genealogy IVAfter the Civil War, most of the Native Americans had been moved to “Indian Territory.” But there were still skirmishes between the newcomers and the Indians who wanted to remain on the Prairie. Even before the war, land speculators and railroad tycoons fenced off Native lands. To attract buyers, they offered it cheap, (it wasn’t the best farming environment). Next came railroad cars full of hundreds of thousands of Texas cattle, and along with the cows came the cowboys. The Indians didn’t stand a chance. Imagine what that must have looked and felt like to the senses of an American Indian. Your homeland is fenced off with barbed wire, guns are going off (and they’re pointed at you) and cowboys who’ve had too much to drink are having dangerous fun at your expense. Don’t get me wrong, I love the idea of rugged individualism and freedom of the open range. I love the romanticism of the cowboy life. But imagine America’s natural beauty before hundreds of thousands of Texas cattle started stampeding through the western plains and guns started going off. Must have been beautiful.

Suellen Ocean is the author of Secret Genealogy IV – Native Americans Hidden in Our Family Trees. Available here:

http://www.amazon.com/Secret-Genealogy-IV-Native-Americans/dp/1500756105

 

 

Genealogy… Thirty-Seven-Thousand-Years-Ago

Usually when I think of my ancestors I visualize them in fashions from a medieval era; stiff collars, lace up shoes or tunics and sometimes I’ll envision more primitive cultures who wore deerskin and loincloths. But imagining what they were like thirty-seven- thousand years ago is a strange sensation.

Native American historical timelines tell us migrating tribes came from Siberia to North America. If American Indians’ oral history is that there was no one else around, archeology discoveries aside, as a group they consider themselves America’s first people and deserve more than a little respect for that.

Visualizing our ancestors sitting on the side of a grassy hill wrapping a stone onto a stick to sling an animal or fishing in the warm sunshine along a rapidly flowing creek… can be good for the head. Primitive ancestral history belongs to us all. Whether you descend from European, African, Middle Eastern or Asian ancestry, it is our story. Why not take the time to visualize it?  Suellen Ocean is the author of Secret Genealogy IV – Native Americans Hidden in Our Family Trees. Available here:

http://www.amazon.com/Secret-Genealogy-IV-Native-Americans/dp/1500756105

eBook or computer download through Smashwords:

https://www.smashwords.com/profile/view/ocean

Kindle COVER Secret Genealogy IV

Genealogy: Did Your Ancestors Live in Indian Country? Perhaps They Were Indian

I’m glancing down at a map from 1763. The whole east coast of the United States is shaded in and designated as “British territory.” The province of Louisiana is shaded in as “Spanish territory.” Sandwiched in-between these two shaded areas is a vast area that extends north of Florida and west of the east coast and goes up and around the Great Lakes. It is shaded and called “Indian Country.” In this vast section of forests, meadows, swamps and mountain regions, lived the Native People of North America. They were driven from the areas marked “Spanish” and “British.” Not only was their culture endangered, their existence was threatened. We know how the story ends. But what were the myriad of stories within the “Indian Country?” Were any of our ancestors Indians? Did they intermarry? Were they slaves? These are not easy questions to answer but they rest in the minds of many of us and we sure would like to know. Suellen Ocean is the author of Secret Genealogy IV – Native Americans Hidden in Our Family Trees. Available here:

http://www.amazon.com/Secret-Genealogy-IV-Native-Americans/dp/1500756105

eBook or computer download through Smashwords:

https://www.smashwords.com/profile/view/ocean

Kindle COVER Secret Genealogy IV

Thanksgiving – Indian Chief Massasoit Was Friendly But It Didn’t End Well

Living in the Southland of what we know now as Massachusetts, an Indian Chief born in 1580, “Massasoit” was friendly and shared food with the Pilgrims, thus beginning America’s first Thanksgiving. This amicable relationship lasted about fifty years until Massasoit’s death in 1661. After this date, one of the Chief’s sons began a bloody war against the Pilgrims.

Suellen Ocean is the author of Secret Genealogy IV – Native Americans Hidden in Our Family Trees. Available here:

http://www.amazon.com/Secret-Genealogy-IV-Native-Americans/dp/1500756105

eBook or computer download through Smashwords:

https://www.smashwords.com/profile/view/ocean

Kindle COVER Secret Genealogy IV